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CustomerCentric Selling® Sales Training Blog

Sales Tips: A La Carte Sales Training

Posted by Jill Perez on Aug 24, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Sales Tips: Avoid A La Carte Training

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales tips to avoid a la carte sales trainingWhen dining out my preference is ordering from a menu and being served rather than filling a plate from a buffet. That may seem to be an odd way to start a sales blog, but I find many companies that go to the trouble and expense of training their salespeople make it an a la carte affair.

When salespeople return from training the standard management question nets out to: What “keepers” are you going to use? This seems analogous to providing a seller with a textbook and black marker and asking him or her to redact any the unimportant words or phrases. Do the exercise with 20 sellers and no two will be the same. This is a major factor in doing “drive by” sales training that doesn’t stick.

In my mind, a more logical approach would be for a small group of selected people to attend a sales workshop to determine if the content and skills are a good fit for their organization. Prior to any internal training, the agenda and content should be tweaked so that ultimately every topic or module that is covered has been deemed relevant and necessary.

Whether training military personnel, production line workers, fireman, law enforcement staff, etc., there is tremendous benefit to be realized when everyone in an organization has a standard set of terms, a common skill set and a defined way to perform tasks. 

The major beneficiaries are sales managers because a common structure and skill set provides a framework to measure the production and skill levels of each seller and determine how to develop and enhance their competencies. Companies that make sales training part of their culture can reap benefits for the long term.

sales training workshops

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: Sales Training, sales tips, selling tips, sales training workshop, sales training workshops, sales process, sales methodology, sales training company, improve sales performance, sales training success, sales approach, sales training approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Knowing When to Walk

Posted by Jill Perez on Aug 17, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Sales Tips: Knowing When to Walk

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales tips for knowing when to walk awayThe worst possible outcome for sellers and vendors is to go through entire sales cycles and lose. This is especially true for large opportunities because it means the seller, support staff and management have spent time, effort and resources with nothing to show for their efforts. My belief is that there are signs along the way and it doesn’t make sense to pursue opportunities that are unlikely to result in orders.

Early in my sales career with it became clear management didn't like unpleasant surprises. If high visibility transactions didn’t close, formal loss reviews were conducted. They were the equivalent of autopsies to figure out how and when things went bad. These sessions were career limiting if and when sellers were found to have made mistakes and hadn’t asked for assistance.

My sales manager was great at telling sellers what to do without sharing HOW to do it. I didn’t like making calls with him but learned early that if opportunities in my pipeline were going sideways, I’d be sure to get him involved. If he didn’t like how things were going he would consider getting his manager involved. Loss reviews went much better when they started out with the question: What could WE have done better? versus What could YOU have done better? 

There was an over-arching expectation that the company should win every opportunity they competed for and a pervasive belief that winners never quit and quitters never win. In retrospect, this was a ridiculous attitude to take. In the clear light of day, when I got my manager involved I felt a loss was likely. If he escalated it to his boss, he felt the same way. Withdrawing from opportunities was never an option.

In Sun Tzu’s Art Of War, required reading within some sales organizations, there are five different strategies that can be employed. One is to choose not to fight if a situation isn’t winnable. Sellers often express surprise when opportunities in their pipelines are lost. Many have cast blind eyes to signals buyers give throughout sales cycles.

It’s unpleasant to realize losses are likely. When that realization occurs, sellers have a choice:

  • Continue spending time and effort on opportunities likely to end in losses OR
  • Withdraw and find higher probability opportunities to work on

The road less traveled is likely to take sellers to a better YTD position against quota.

sales training workshop

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: Sales Training, sales tips, selling tips, sales training workshop, sales training workshops, sales process, sales methodology, sales training company, improve sales performance, sales training success, sales approach, sales training approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Behavior Follows Belief

Posted by Jill Perez on Aug 12, 2016 3:33:27 PM

Sales Tips: Behavior Follows Belief

By Frank Visgatis, President & Chief Operating Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales trainingBack in the 1970’s, IBM was the gold standard of sales training. They would put their salespeople through a program that lasted up to six months and relied heavily on high-intensity role plays and simulations. While brutal for the students, the end “product” was salespeople who were accustomed to high pressure selling environments who weren’t afraid to work whatever hours were necessary to successfully navigate a sell cycle. 

When I got into sales in the late 1980’s, companies were still, for the most part, willing to invest heavily in training their salespeople on the best practices of the day. Many programs that I went through, including my introduction to ones that specialized in how to sell complex, often disruptive, expensive offerings to diverse buying committees, were the proverbial “walk of fire.” Although not six months in length like the IBM model, they were nonetheless multi-day, intensive programs that required commitment, focus and late nights of casework.

Then, as time went on, I noticed the length of time of most training agendas (and coincidentally the corresponding investment requirement) began to erode. Sales organizations and the executives who ran them seemed to come to the conclusion that “we don’t need a whole week of training, we can do it in one or two days.” The advent of CBT (“Computer-Based Training,” for any of you who are not old enough to remember that term) and its sexy successor “e-learning,” became the excuse everyone needed to justify what would ultimately prove to be an ineffective solution.

Over the years, I have seen companies fall into a disturbing pattern of “train-fail-rinse-repeat.”

In other words, when faced with underperforming sales organizations, someone (usually the new VP of Sales) decides, “We need to train our salespeople.” They then venture forth into the marketplace, much the way their buyers do, and evaluate various sales methodologies and approaches based either on the recommendations of their peers on LinkedIn, general Internet research or worse, becoming enamored of whatever the “bright and shiny” methodology du jour is.

Then they face a real challenge.

Often times, the vendors in the sales training space fail to effectively communicate the value they provide, usually by not even following their own approach, and they immediately cave to not only price pressure but more significantly, time pressure. Their customer demands that what used to take a week to accomplish must now be done in a day or two and sadly, the training vendor acquiesces.

But logic says that you can’t magically compress 96 hours into 48, so “something has to give.”

And that “something” is usually the most time and resource-intensive part, the role-play, skill development and case study exercises. Without these components, the “training” becomes an intellectual experience that makes sense to everyone, but since no real behavior modification has taken place, salespeople leave with some interesting knowledge and perspectives, but then default back to their old ways of doing things.

With no real behavior modification and often, only lip service support from first line management, nine months go by and nothing changes. No improvement in revenue production. No improvement in forecast accuracy. Long sell cycles that continue to die the slow death of “no decision.” Then management decides, “We must have done the wrong training”.

Train. Fail. Rinse. Repeat.

In order for companies to break this vicious cycle, they need to recognize that as much as their salespeople need training, they need behavior modification more.

Salespeople will only embrace and succeed with a new approach when they believe they can be more effective, make more money and achieve their personal goals and objectives by changing the way they do things. That will only happen when they experience that change firsthand through the self-discovery process of leaving their comfort zone and actually trying to do things differently in a controlled and facilitated environment.

sales training workshop

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: Sales Training, sales tips, selling tips, sales training workshop, sales training workshops, sales process, sales methodology, sales training company, improve sales performance, sales training success, sales approach, sales training approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Can "A" Players Improve?

Posted by Jill Perez on Aug 10, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Sales Tips: Can "A" Players Improve?

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales processA common perception is that extraordinary salespeople don’t need and won’t benefit from learning new sales process approaches. I’d venture to say that in making decisions to implement sales process, most of the perceived and anticipated benefits would be realized by having B and C Players perform at higher levels.

A few years ago I was teaching a workshop for new hires of a long-term client. A seller that had taken the initial sales training workshop stopped in the classroom just before we started. Jeff was a consistent top performer and I asked him how business was. To my surprise he said things were going very well and that CustomerCentric Selling® was a significant factor. He went on to say that prior to the workshop he was “maxed out,” albeit at a healthy revenue number and that he had been able to increase his annual revenue by 50%. 

When asked why, he said using a formal process to more stringently quality/disqualify opportunities allowed him to avoid wasting time on deals that were unlikely to close. He referenced one of the core concepts of CCS®: Bad news early is good news. 

Recently, I spoke with a person who was also a top sales performer and had just accepted a promotion to become a sales manager. In his case he estimated an increase of about 40% as a result of “selling on purpose” and learning early that opportunities weren’t worth his time if:

  • Business goals weren’t shared early
  • Value could not be established
  • Access to members of the buying committee was denied

Regardless of how talented a seller is, everyone gets the same amount of time to work with. Having a structure to prevent wasting time, effort and resources should increase production. The most painful outcomes are the ones where sellers go all the way to the end and lose to a competitor or “no decision.” Having the ability to quantify opportunities based upon buyer actions can help sellers at all levels understand the difference between activity and progress. You never get the time back that you spent on losing opportunities.

sales training workshop

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: Sales Training, sales tips, selling tips, sales training workshop, sales training workshops, sales process, sales methodology, sales training company, improve sales performance, sales training success, sales approach, sales training approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Time to Sharpen the Ax

Posted by Jill Perez on Aug 4, 2016 11:35:28 AM

Sales Tips: Is It Time to Sharpen the Ax?

By Gary Walker, EVP of Channel Sales & Operations, CustomerCentric Selling®

Improve Sales PerformanceAs the result of our weekly Sales Thoughts and other published articles, we have the opportunity to speak with salespeople and sales leaders almost on a daily basis. We talk about their sales process and what they can do to make it more effective; how to conduct a territory prospecting planning session; etc. We gain very valuable insights from these conversations.

A question that I often get asked in some form is, "Should I train my sales people?" Or, "Do I really need to train my salespeople?" The fact of the matter is, you as a sales leader should be answering that question, not me.

However, I do have to tell you that I’m convinced that you become so laser focused on revenue attainment, that you overlook many of the sales behaviors which lead to revenue attainment.  You know, “I don’t have time to sharpen the ax! I’m too busy chopping wood.”

So what I’ve done is come up with some questions that you can use to begin to self-diagnose your team’s performance. It’s not an all-inclusive list, just a short list of simple YES or NO sales performance questions about your sales team and how it is performing.

In order to protect your privacy this is not an interactive form. It’s a static document that you can print off and complete. Put a check mark next to the appropriate answer.

Sales Performance Improvement

 Okay, now it’s time to look at how you responded. Total up your YES and NO answers. What can you conclude about your sales team? Do they have some sales performance issues that need to be corrected? Do you need to take the time to "sharpen the ax?" If you do and 50% of your sales team close ONE additional piece of business in the next twelve months, what will it be worth to you and your company?

Please feel free to call me (1-800-993-1228, ext 702) if I can be of assistance to you and your salespeople.

sales training workshops

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: sales tips, selling tips, sales process, improve sales performance, sales approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Do Your Buyers Have A Sense Of Urgency?

Posted by Jill Perez on Aug 3, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Sales Tips: Do Your Buyers Have a Sense of Urgency?

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales tips for creating sense of urgency with buyersWhen trying to get to the end of sales cycles, sellers always seem to be in a hurry. In stark contrast, buyers frequently drag their feet before making decisions to spend money. Consider how often close dates slip for opportunities in the forecast. This discrepancy in decision timeframes can cause sellers to close prematurely, offer discounts to accelerate decisions and pressure buyers. In extreme situations, deals can be lost. It often comes down to the seller’s or vendor’s agenda of needing to book orders at month, quarter or year-end.

I’m consulting with a client and recently was discussing a $500,000 software opportunity in a seller’s pipeline that he hopes to close by year-end. There are four internal organizations whose senior executives comprise the buying committee along with the CEO.

The vendor offers a platform to integrate all operational aspects and allow IT to provide real-time dashboard views of the business. The platform being considered supports all the different applications being used with tested API’s that would allow the implementation and cut over to the new system in less than a month.

The CIO is a potential adversary. He has talked about having his staff design and build a platform from the ground up to integrate their existing software. The seller and I agreed it makes no financial sense to go the “homegrown” route. The fact is that it’s an option being considered and can’t be dismissed out of hand.

My first question for the seller: Have you established the cost of delay?

He didn't understand my question so I asked if he had quantified the potential savings from the perspective of each of the Key Players in the buying committee. He said the payback on his software had not been fully itemized but that it would be a “no brainer” financial decision. I encouraged him to drill down with each executive to identify key business metrics, establish baselines (where they are today), have them estimate what improvement could be realized and wherever possible, quantify the value. He’s in the throes of doing this with the objective of creating an enterprise-wide view of the potential value of his offerings.

Let’s assume the seller can help the executives identify a savings of $250K per month and that it would take one month to migrate to the new platform. The question then becomes how long it will take IT to design, code and test an entirely new platform, understanding their staff will have to continue supporting end users and legacy systems. If IT’s estimate is more than three months (how often are new applications delivered on schedule?) it would be possible to buy the existing offering and replace it when the new software is ready.

An interesting thing happens when buyers are aware of the cost of delay (how much potential value they’re losing each month). This strategy can be used to combat “no decision” outcomes when buyers decide to build things themselves or merely determine they don’t want to spend the money now. Realizing that every month of delay costs company money is a motivator for committees to make decisions sooner rather than later. 

Many sellers wrongly believe they compete only with other vendors in their space. The reality is all vendors compete for a finite pool of funding. Before spending budgeted money, people in finance will reallocate funds if another vendor offers a more compelling cost vs. benefit or ROI. An added benefit of determining cost of delay is that buyers join sellers in wanting to reach the decision point. This perceived internal pressure for buyers to act is more effective than the external pressure of sellers desperately trying to get orders on their timeframes. It also puts sellers in a better position to negotiate if pressured on price. 

My advice is that sellers should be wary of the potential for no decision/homegrown outcomes. Helping committees create a compelling cost of delay is an effective way to proactively increase the chances of winning the business.  

sales training workshops

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: sales tips, selling tips, sales process, improve sales performance, sales approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Death of Product Differentiators

Posted by Jill Perez on Jul 27, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Sales Tips: Death of Product Differentiators

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales tips for competitive advantageRita Gunther McGrath is a professor at the Columbia Business School. A few years ago her book The End of Competitive Advantage espoused the thought that shrinking product development times and shorter product life cycles make it unreasonable for vendors to enjoy long-term product advantages. I agree with her premise and feel it is a continuing trend. The concept was unsettling for people in Product Development, Product Marketing, Marketing and Sales.

I remember in my first sales position with IBM that when competing with a vendor I wasn’t familiar with, I’d contact the regional competitive analysis support staff to explain the situation. They’d provide “knock-offs” (perceived strengths of our offering or weaknesses of the competing vendor). I’m not sure it helped sellers as they made calls with a rigid idea of where they wanted to take buyers. There certainly were instances where selling against competitors took precedent over selling our own offerings. 

Years ago a phrase I often used was: Given price and product are relatively equal, the better seller will win most of the time. By that I meant that the way somebody sold could provide the Holy Grail: a sustainable competitive advantage. For the last 10 years or so I’ve amended my thought to:

The company that provides a superior buying experience will win most of the time.

This change reflects the fact that most buying experiences now begin electronically, and it’s important for Sales and Marketing to coordinate efforts and agree to the steps needed to nurture visitors to develop them into leads.

That said, opportunities begin in one of two (2) ways: 

  1. Inbound - Which for many complex B2B offerings means that mid to low level staff are evaluating products with or without sponsorship (budget?) from executives. To Rita McGrath’s point, the buying experience (how to handle visitors) will change quickly as companies frequently research what their competitors are doing and making changes accordingly to their websites and strategies.

Some of the major challenges with inbound are that:

  • Visitors evaluate several vendors in parallel (there usually is no “Column A vendor”)
  • Entry points are low and gaining access to higher levels may be difficult
  • Vendors don’t have the ability to target companies they feel most likely fit the profile of an ideal prospect
  1. Outbound - Key Players are difficult to contact, but proactive outbound efforts to take them from latent to active need to achieve specific business outcomes provides huge benefits to vendors that are successful in doing so:
  • Higher entry points make qualification easier
  • Taking Key Players from latent to active need allow sellers to start as Column A
  • Average transaction sizes are likely to be larger because budget constraints aren’t as much in play
  • Buying cycles will usually be shorter
  • Win rates will likely be higher
  • Ideal profiles can be targeted

Googling “cold calling is dead” recently yielded 3,750,000 hits. Traditional cold calling will yield disappointing results. Two findings from an American Marketing Association survey provide insight as to why:

  1. On average it takes 7.2 contacts before reaching executives
  2. An overwhelming majority of sellers give up after making 1-3 contact attempts

Vendors that realize bus dev should be a process rather than a random activity and design a series of touches will have the ability to proactively build pipelines that start at executive levels. If it were easy everyone would be doing it. Those that do it well have a reward waiting:

A sustainable competitive advantage. 

sales training workshop

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: sales tips, selling tips, sales process, improve sales performance, sales approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Stop Spouting Features Buyers Don't Need

Posted by Jill Perez on Jul 20, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Sales Tips: Stop Spouting Features Your Buyers Don't Need

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales tips for understanding buyer needsMost salespeople are proud of the products/offerings they sell. The most significant mistake I made when starting my Sales career was to believe my job was educating buyers about offerings. One of the biggest challenges was determining which features were relevant to buyers I was calling on.

I’m not proud to share there were instances where I got into “spray and pray” mode by blindly telling buyers about features. This was a tremendous waste of the buyer’s time and made little or no progress toward earning sales. Beyond that, when buyers decided certain features mentioned weren’t relevant, they were likely to start down the road of concluding that my offering was too complicated and therefore too expensive. This was an early death spiral for most buying cycles.

Since we created CustomerCentric Selling® in 2002, we have said the primary difference between superior sellers (A Players) and the rest (B and C Players) is patience. There are many areas where patience is important, but presenting offerings AFTER understanding a buyer’s needs is critical. 

In my mind superior sellers earn the right to talk about specific capabilities of their offerings. The best way I know is to follow the Covey core concept: Start with the end in mind. By that I mean sellers should create diagnostic questions for potentially relevant features. Based upon how buyers answer these questions should enable sellers to present only those parts of their offerings that buyers are likely to find useful/valuable.

A seller’s mission in first calls can be defined as: 

  1. Learning a buyer’s desired business outcomes.
  2. Asking diagnostic questions so that buyers understand barriers to achieving outcomes.
  3. Offering only those capabilities that address the barriers.
  4. Asking the buyer if having those capabilities would enable them to achieve the outcomes.

Blurting out random features or worse yet, doing “spray and pray” demonstrations without first understanding buyer needs is like entering a dark cave without a flashlight. I strongly suggest sellers do pre-call planning by creating diagnostic questions, which can be very enlightening for buyers.  

sales training workshop

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: sales tips, selling tips, sales process, improve sales performance, sales approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: LinkedIn Social Selling

Posted by Jill Perez on Jul 13, 2016 2:49:33 PM

Sales Tips: How to Leverage LinkedIn Social Selling

By Gary Walker, EVP of Channel Sales & Operations, CustomerCentric Selling®

LinkedIn Social Selling Sales TipsI’m a regular contributor to CustomerCentric Selling®’s weekly ‘Sales Thought.’ (If you're not receiving them in your inbox every Monday morning, CLICK HERE to subscribe.) For those of you following me, you see a short article, a sales tip, maybe even a sales tactic, about every third week that I personally author. As a contributor, I’m on a mission to provide you with actionable information that you can use to:

  • improve your sales performance
  • add to or improve your existing skill set
  • and potentially help advance a current opportunity you're working on.

Why? Because in almost every respect I am a salesperson just like you are. I’m constantly striving to be more effective. On a daily basis I’m working to:

  • identify new opportunities
  • engage with senior sales executives
  • identify issues that I might be in a position to help them address
  • understand why these issues exist
  • understand how these issues are impacting their sales organizations and salespeople
  • and understand what CustomerCentric Selling® capabilities they believe they need, moving forward, to correct the performance of an underperforming team.

This week, it’s going to be a little different. I recently came across a blog entitled, “5 Ways to Boost B2B Sales Through LinkedIn Social Selling” that I want to share with you. It was written by Russell Banzon, Demand Generation Manager at Inkling. I’ve elected to share this with you for the following reasons:

1. You can put his five (5) strategies into play immediately; they are all actionable now. They are tactical!

2. His strategies are identical to what we have been teaching in our CustomerCentric Selling® Prospecting and Business Development Work Sessions.  

3. Social Selling continues to be overlooked by most salespeople and the organizations they work for. However, did you know that social sellers create 45% more opportunities and are 51% more likely to achieve quota?

4. LinkedIn is NOT just a place where you post your profile and sit on the sidelines and wait. You've got to join in the game. It’s time to participate!

5. Articles, posts and blogs like these give people the courage to begin to change how they sell.  

6. It helps validate what we have been instructing our clients to do for the last three (3) years!  

Like I said, this is a departure from my traditional contributions and posts, but I think you will benefit from Russell’s strategies and how succinctly he has positioned them. Read it, begin to put them into play and forward this post to a co-worker or peer.

CLICK HERE to read Russell's post on LinkedIn Social Selling.

sales training workshop

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: sales tips, selling tips, sales process, improve sales performance, sales approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach

Sales Tips: Always Stay Curious

Posted by Jill Perez on Jul 13, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Sales Tips: Why Sellers Should Always Stay Curious

By John Holland, Chief Content Officer, CustomerCentric Selling®

sales tips to always stay curiousThere are many successful professionals I know that would struggle in a selling role. The skill set needed to be a successful B2B salesperson is daunting. When people are asked what the requisite characteristics of a successful salesperson are, one of the most common responses is having “nice way” with people. That may be true of a greeter as Caesar’s Palace but sellers have to be much more that that.

As you might expect, some characteristics of successful sellers include:

  • strong verbal skills
  • intelligence
  • extensive industry knowledge
  • resiliency
  • willingness to risk compensation on performance, etc.

Once acquired, most skills remain assets for salespeople but I feel there is one notable exception: Curiosity.

In my mind superior sellers go into initial meetings or conversations with a strong desire to find out as much as they can about the buyer:

  • His/her desired business outcomes
  • A mutual understanding of why they can’t be achieve today
  • A good idea that the potential benefit will outweigh the cost

Sadly, over the years sellers can get to the point where they feel they’ve “seen it all.” This attitude usually causes fewer questions to be asked. Shortcuts are taken in need development as many assumptions are being made. To a buyer, this attitude may be perceived as a lack of interest.

Without realizing it, buyers may conclude the seller is merely going through the motions. In fact, an early sign of waning curiosity is sellers deciding pre-call planning and preparation aren’t necessary.

Most likely, an experienced seller has been guilty of not putting his or her best foot forward in some calls for whatever reason. My suggestion is to try to be sure to focus on being curious about each buyer.

sales training workshop

Need some help to increase sales? Take a look at the sales training workshops available to get started and improve sales performance. Your Roadmap to Revenue Growth® awaits!

Topics: sales tips, selling tips, sales process, improve sales performance, sales approach, selling process, sales technique, sales tip, selling technique, sales performance, selling approach